Diversity Training Comes to NC State University

North Carolina State University students need to be taught about how to be “inclusive,” according to the school’s chancellor and top administrators. Last June, NC State Chancellor Randy Woodson released a statement decrying individual and systemic racism and revealed the university’s plan to roll out mandatory diversity, equity, and inclusion training for students, faculty, and … Continue reading “Diversity Training Comes to NC State University”


UNC’s 1619 Project Hire: A Case Study of Failed University Governance

The recent hiring of New York Times columnist Nikole Hannah-Jones as a faculty member in UNC-Chapel Hill’s Hussman School of Journalism raises serious red flags about how the university is being run. Last week, the Martin Center’s Jay Schalin reported on Hannah-Jones’s appointment to the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism at UNC. Hannah-Jones … Continue reading “UNC’s 1619 Project Hire: A Case Study of Failed University Governance”


Letter to the Editor: The state should have a voice in who runs public universities

To the editor: I neither know Darrell Allison nor anything about his appointment as Chancellor at  Fayetteville State University. But I also read that he is seeking to improve FSU’s retention and graduation rates, which reportedly are some of the worst in the UNC system.  That’s not necessarily going to be popular with the Faculty … Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: The state should have a voice in who runs public universities”


Perpetual Scandal-Mongering as a Political Tool

Members of the media and faculty erupted into histrionics at the recent appointment of Darrell Allison to the chancellorship of Fayetteville State University. It is a great scandal, they claimed; Allison “cut in line” cried the left-wing think tank NC Policy Watch; the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and FSU faculty senate questioned not … Continue reading “Perpetual Scandal-Mongering as a Political Tool”


Letter to the Editor: Conflicts of interest in university governance

To the editor: “A Chancellor Search Tainted with Suspicion and Shrouded in Secrecy” is a great example of political corruption in higher education—as viewed from the outside.  Politically connected players have always used their advantages to leverage even more benefits when they can get away with it. No wonder this looks like corruption to faculty … Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: Conflicts of interest in university governance”


A Chancellor Search Tainted with Suspicion and Shrouded in Secrecy 

The recent appointment of Darrell Allison to the chancellorship of Fayetteville State University (FSU) has sparked a controversy. The UNC Board of Governors’ (BOG) announcement elicited immediate pushback from those in the campus community and the story quickly attracted national attention. Allison was a member of the UNC BOG until last September when he abruptly … Continue reading “A Chancellor Search Tainted with Suspicion and Shrouded in Secrecy “


Don’t Rock the Boat: UNC BOG Members Rarely Vote ‘Nay’

The members of the University of North Carolina Board of Governors are charged with a solemn duty: to oversee and guide the state’s public university system. Although some of their day-to-day responsibilities might seem mundane, many of the decisions they make shape the system’s standards, values, and the extent to which the university’s dual mission … Continue reading “Don’t Rock the Boat: UNC BOG Members Rarely Vote ‘Nay’”


Heavy Is the Head that Wears the Crown

Since 2015, the University of North Carolina system’s Board of Governors (BOG) has endured one controversy after another, beginning with protests over decisions to close three “academic centers” for being overly political and to replace Democrat Thomas Ross as the system president with Republican Margaret Spellings. Some of the problems have been of the board’s … Continue reading “Heavy Is the Head that Wears the Crown”



‘Price creep’ on chancellor pay extends from California to Carolina

This spring Chancellor Marye Anne Fox surprised folks at North Carolina State University and the UNC system when she announced that she had accepted the chancellorship at the University of California at San Diego. It didn’t take long, however, for people at UNC to find an old foe to blame for Fox’s departure: low pay.