The Diversity bureaucracy will always be “successful,” despite failures

To the editor: Prof. Weissberg seems a bit baffled by the Loyalty Oaths required by the New Red Guard.  He asks, “Is there anything that suggests that this latest effort will finally be successful?” Silly wabbit.  Lucky for him he’s retired, otherwise I’m afraid he’d be compelled to public confessions followed by some sort of … Continue reading “The Diversity bureaucracy will always be “successful,” despite failures”


How academia can be saved from within

To the editor: While I think Peter Bonilla is spot on in his article “The Biggest Threat to Academic Freedom?  We Don’t Teach It.”, I think a more macro view reveals how uncontained the problem is to academia and that what is threatened is all Human thought; what is threatened is Humanity. When it becomes … Continue reading “How academia can be saved from within”


Conservative poetry

To the editor: Dear Editor: Stevens far superior to Yeats? Writer of this might know conservatism but among poets, poetry academe, etc. Yeats is second only to Shakespeare, if he is second at all. You have to throw in Gerard Manley Hopkins here as well, who is second to none. And then there’s John Donne. … Continue reading “Conservative poetry”


Why faculty members make poor administrators

To the editor: Here is why faculty and faculty administrators make poor administrators that is not related to peer governance that shrinks from decisions. Very few are trained or self-trained in: 1. Basic management practices: delegation, supervision, finance, budget practices, communications 2. Designing and evaluating a full curriculum and relating it to the mission 3. … Continue reading “Why faculty members make poor administrators”


“Academic freedom” used to silence

To the editor: I hope that Jay Schalin comments on situations where a professor takes actions to prevent invited speakers from speaking by claiming “academic freedom” to interrupt. Joseph Visalli Schodack, NY


Free speech legislation needs to include consequences for violations

To the editor: In “What Should We Do About Critical Race Theory?”, the author talks about Mississippi legislation that promotes “diversity of ideas” on campuses. North Carolina legislature already tried one of these “free speech on campus” laws to promote the “diversity of ideas,” but did not include consequences.  So universities (the untouchable institutions) have … Continue reading “Free speech legislation needs to include consequences for violations”


Letter to the Editor: Diversity statements have already diminished the academy

To the editor: Prof. Jenkins is way too optimistic. He tells us, “The result of this practice [the Thought Police ensuring Ideological Purity in our Institutions of Higher Education] over time will be to further diminish the academy.”Over time? The time is now…was yesterday…or maybe 20 years ago.And the Academy IS diminished, a shade, a … Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: Diversity statements have already diminished the academy”


Letter to the Editor: This is Higher Education, Right should really matter

To the editor: “This is America, Right should matter.” Alexander Vindman, LtCol, USA, (Retired) “This is Higher Education, Right should really matter.” (paraphrase) Lorretta Breuning, I concur with Dr Bruening.  I earned my undergraduate degree at the Air Force Academy.  I did not fully appreciate the value of our honor code: “We will not lie, … Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: This is Higher Education, Right should really matter”


Letter to the Editor: Restructure student loan payments

To the editor: In reading the many points presented and disparity in socio- economic difference, why has no one ever merely looked at the repayment system and interest accrual on student loans. Re structuring students loans similar to house and car payments were once monthly payments are met additional funding can be applied to the … Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: Restructure student loan payments”


Letter to the Editor: How to teach students how to think

To the editor: Excellent article: how to teach students how to think. I have a few additions: read the new methods of reporting the most catastrophic events of the past century by reading Soviet and Polish dissident literature, primarily Solzhenitzen (the Gulag Archipelago) and Shalamov (the Kolyma Tales) novel form of reporting on Auschwitz done … Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: How to teach students how to think”