How the Woke Mob Captured Business Schools

Business schools in the United States are fiercely competitive and, by and large, led by intelligent, careful individuals. The top schools’ nigh universal endorsement of progressive values—in word and in deed—sets the tone for the rest and stems neither from incompetence nor malicious intent. Rather, it stems from incentives dictated by rankings criteria and ideologically … Continue reading “How the Woke Mob Captured Business Schools”


Three Ways to Teach Students How—Not What—to Think

How do we teach students how to think rather than what to think? If the latest election cycle showed us anything, it’s that parents care deeply about what their children are taught in schools. Unfortunately, too many students are being indoctrinated into worldviews that don’t match their families’ values. There is no place where this … Continue reading “Three Ways to Teach Students How—Not What—to Think”


Progressivism Surges Through America’s Law Schools

Law schools in the U.S. used to be run by no-nonsense individuals who, whatever their personal politics, thought that their institutions existed to teach students about the law, not to engage in advocacy or speculation. That began to change in the 1980s, as some younger law professors started to push into previously forbidden terrain, introducing … Continue reading “Progressivism Surges Through America’s Law Schools”


The Campaign to Stamp Out Academic Heresy

Back in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries, church officials felt it necessary to scrutinize every book or pamphlet for the slightest hint of heresy. If the work deviated from doctrine, it would be banned, burned, and the author could be punished. The Enlightenment brought a change in attitude toward freedom of speech. In Britain, … Continue reading “The Campaign to Stamp Out Academic Heresy”


The Spurning of Old Books: The Devaluation of the Past Threatens Higher Ed

Alan Jacobs’ new book, Breaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader’s Guide to a More Tranquil Mind, is a coaxing argument to read “old books that come from strange times.” Readers of his previous works The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction and How to Think will not be surprised that Jacobs, distinguished … Continue reading “The Spurning of Old Books: The Devaluation of the Past Threatens Higher Ed”


Urban Universities: Part of the Solution or Part of the Problem?

Look at any map of our recent presidential elections and a key fault-line in our fractured country becomes clear. Cities and their denser suburbs vote overwhelmingly Democratic and show up as blue islands. It’s also true that many of our most influential universities are located on those islands and leftist sentiment is even more pronounced in them than … Continue reading “Urban Universities: Part of the Solution or Part of the Problem?”


College Faculties Are Mostly Leftist and Becoming More So

A paper recently published in Econ Journal Watch, “Faculty Voter Registration in Economics, History, Journalism, Law, and Psychology,” shows that something almost everyone believes to be true—that college faculties in the social sciences are predominantly left of center—is in fact true. More than that, however it shows that this is more true in some fields and … Continue reading “College Faculties Are Mostly Leftist and Becoming More So”


No, the Clinton Plan Won’t “Fix College”

Hillary Clinton’s higher education policy ideas have been taking a lot of criticism. Here, for example, is an analysis by economics professor Gary Wolfram, published in May by the Pope Center. And here’s my take. Apparently, opposition to Clinton’s proposals is sufficiently worrisome to Democrats that on September 10, Robert Shireman (undersecretary in the Department of Education … Continue reading “No, the Clinton Plan Won’t “Fix College””


A Visiting Professor of Conservative Thought Takes on Boulder, Colorado

Several years ago, the University of Colorado Boulder did something pioneering in American higher education. It committed to bringing onto its faculty, on a rotating basis, a notable academic conservative in an endowed chair. I held this chair, the Visiting Scholar in Conservative Thought & Policy, over the past academic year, following upon Bradley Birzer … Continue reading “A Visiting Professor of Conservative Thought Takes on Boulder, Colorado”