To Fight Student Loan Debt, North Carolina Schools Need to Stop Pushing Parent PLUS Loans

Student loan debt has received more attention lately, but one aspect has been left out of the debate: parents taking on loans for their children. While undergraduate students generally can only borrow $12,500 each year, Parent PLUS loans have no such limits. This is the first year that the U.S. Department of Education has shared … Continue reading “To Fight Student Loan Debt, North Carolina Schools Need to Stop Pushing Parent PLUS Loans”


Did You Know? HBCU Enrollments Fall 11% in Last Decade

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) were founded to serve African American students whom white colleges would not admit. The University of North Carolina wouldn’t admit black undergraduates until 1955. As institutions and universities in the South kept out black students, colleges beyond the South implemented quotas to limit their admission. Shortly after the Civil … Continue reading “Did You Know? HBCU Enrollments Fall 11% in Last Decade”


Did You Know? The North Carolina Colleges with High Student Default Rates

When students take federal loans to pay for college, the government declares them to be in default if a student doesn’t make a payment for 9 months. According to the Department of Education, North Carolina has an 11.6 percent federal student loan default rate. That rate is slightly higher than the national average of 11.3 … Continue reading “Did You Know? The North Carolina Colleges with High Student Default Rates”


Closing the Gap at North Carolina’s Historically Black Universities

Earlier this month, the Triangle Business Journal revealed that graduates from North Carolina’s Historically Black College and Universities (HBCUs) are lagging their peers in terms of median salary after graduation. As the state bolsters its efforts to attract more students to its public HBCUs, it’s especially important to discover the cause of such disparities and … Continue reading “Closing the Gap at North Carolina’s Historically Black Universities”