Did You Know? Student Loan “Pauses” Help Those Who Can Afford to Pay

At the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, policymakers implemented sweeping relief programs to offset the economic shock of lockdowns, layoffs, and shifts in consumer behavior. Among these actions was a provision for the blanket forbearance of student loan debt for 42.3 million borrowers. Despite the well-intentioned nature of such “payment freeze” policies, little was initially … Continue reading “Did You Know? Student Loan “Pauses” Help Those Who Can Afford to Pay”


Reducing Student Cost and Enhancing the Value of College Education

Soon, high school graduates will be making monumental decisions that will determine their future quality of life. These decisions include whether to attend college; if so, where; and finally, what degree program to pursue. Research shows that while not guaranteeing career success, a college degree often affords students more control over their destiny and enables a … Continue reading “Reducing Student Cost and Enhancing the Value of College Education”


Chipping Away at Critical Theory’s Dominance of Higher Ed

I was recently invited to visit the second National Conservative Conference in Orlando, the first in-person conference of this movement, since its birth in 2019. I had the opportunity to hear a talk by conservative activist Christopher Rufo about the policies of counterrevolution against critical theory in the country’s institutions, including its colleges and universities. … Continue reading “Chipping Away at Critical Theory’s Dominance of Higher Ed”


How Did We Get Into the Debt Trap?

No one spoke of college students being trapped in debt until rather recently. Prior to the advent of federal student aid programs, college wasn’t expensive, few Americans regarded it as important to their lives, and what borrowing they did for it was through private institutions that were careful not to lend where they perceived too … Continue reading “How Did We Get Into the Debt Trap?”


Did You Know? Another Pause on Student Loan Repayments

Student loans in the U.S. total nearly $1.7 trillion, and at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Trump temporarily paused federal student loan payments and dropped interest rates to zero. The original suspension, which began on March 13, 2020, was only meant to last two months. It has now been extended by both President … Continue reading “Did You Know? Another Pause on Student Loan Repayments”


North Carolina Aims to Halt Predatory Student Loan Lending

Student debt isn’t necessarily always bad. For some, taking out the necessary amount of loans to fund one’s education may be a prudent decision. But before taking out a loan, students should consider how much they actually need to borrow, from whom they should borrow, and whether they will likely be able to repay the … Continue reading “North Carolina Aims to Halt Predatory Student Loan Lending”


Biden Could Shake Up Higher Ed—If He Doesn’t Endorse the Status Quo

Now that President Biden has been sworn in as the 46th president, he wants to hit the ground running and attend to urgent priorities. One of his first moves was to extend student loan payment deferrals until October, buying time for further reforms to America’s higher education system. Deferrals will be one small part of … Continue reading “Biden Could Shake Up Higher Ed—If He Doesn’t Endorse the Status Quo”


Could Law School Be the Worst Higher Education Investment?

For decades, law school was a growth industry. Back in 1970, there were 146 law schools with an enrollment of 78,000 students; by 2013, there were 201 schools, enrolling 139,000 students. Enrollment peaked in 2010 at 147,000. (For the current year, it seems that enrollments will probably remain level with last year.) By 2015, we … Continue reading “Could Law School Be the Worst Higher Education Investment?”


The Burden of Uncle Sam’s “Generosity” Towards College Students

It was a bad idea for the federal government ever to get into the business of financing college with its various grants and loans, but at least in the old days, most of the money loaned was eventually repaid. Now that the overselling of higher education has boiled over, politicians are eager to show their … Continue reading “The Burden of Uncle Sam’s “Generosity” Towards College Students”