Did You Know? The Negative Effects of Affirmative Action on Minority Students

Affirmative action policies aim to increase the representation of minorities in higher education. Some, however, have objected to these policies and argue students should be admitted based on academic merit, not based on race. And evidence suggests that race-based admissions policies negatively affect minority students. In a 2013 article entitled “The Sad Irony of Affirmative … Continue reading “Did You Know? The Negative Effects of Affirmative Action on Minority Students”


Did You Know? The Role of Feeder Schools in Elite Higher Ed

Boarding schools and charter schools have been “feeder schools” to the Ivy Leagues for decades. Feeder schools are high schools where many or most students go to higher education institutions, often the most prestigious schools like the Ivy League. Many parents believe that they should send their children to elite private schools to guarantee their … Continue reading “Did You Know? The Role of Feeder Schools in Elite Higher Ed”


Motte-and-Bailey: The Academic Threat from ‘Lived Experience’

A few years ago, my friend Sheila recounted an incident of alleged racism she experienced at a café in California. While waiting in line to order a coffee, a barista took the order of an older white woman first. The barista didn’t refuse service to Sheila and was polite when she finally took her order. … Continue reading “Motte-and-Bailey: The Academic Threat from ‘Lived Experience’”


Why Universities Should Not Be Anti-Racist

During the last year, many universities throughout North America have declared “anti-racism” to be their official policy. Consider this sample of quotations. “We must ask how Princeton can address systemic racism in the world, and we must also ask how to address it within our own community.” —Christopher L. Eisgruber, president, Princeton University. “The University … Continue reading “Why Universities Should Not Be Anti-Racist”


To De-Politicize Art Schools, Students Need to Fight Back  

It has never been harder to teach artistic individualism in America. A religious devotion to the causes of social justice dominates the ideas of professors in the academy, and David Randall’s report “Social Justice Education in America” has made clear that their evangelical zeal for teaching students the merits of intersectional political activism is topped … Continue reading “To De-Politicize Art Schools, Students Need to Fight Back  “


The Last Refuge of Pure Meritocracy

Racial consideration for college admissions hearkens back to Grutter v. Bollinger, the landmark decision by the Supreme Court in 2003. It held that affirmative action programs can pass muster as long as they are “narrowly tailored” in order to achieve the “compelling interest” of promoting diversity on college campuses. Colleges across the country have since … Continue reading “The Last Refuge of Pure Meritocracy”


Whither Race-Neutrality in California?

In 1996, California voters approved Proposition 209 by an impressive 56-to-44 percent majority. Prop 209 amended the state’s constitution to prohibit the granting of preferences based on race or gender. It inaugurated a series of campaigns, led by businessman and University of California Regent Ward Connerly, that by 2006 had established similar prohibitions in 10 … Continue reading “Whither Race-Neutrality in California?”


N.C. universities continue to chase diversity, but at what cost?

The diversity movement continues apace in North Carolina higher education. Universities continue to expend resources in pursuit of diversity, a term generally used to refer to having an appropriate mix of students and faculty of different races, genders, and sexual preferences, as well as course offerings tailored to that mix.


To save the world, race-crazed academics teach ‘whiteness,’ too

One night the comic-strip character Binkley from Bloom County woke his father with the rant, “Well, Dad, I guess it’s safe to say we aren’t exactly a couple of short, Hispanic, Hindu, French-speaking, physically handicapped, Communist, gay, black women.” Binkley’s problem that night was his realization that “in every regard, we’re hopelessly in the majority.”


No excuses for media mistreatment of UNC-CH salary study

A recent study of faculty salaries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has revealed a significant salary gap between white male faculty and minority faculty. Now that this pay gap has been proven, it’s time for the university to address this obvious pay bias.
The next step is hard but clear: UNC-CH must take corrective action to pay white males more. The good news is at least they’re now getting paid more than females.