Incentivizing Quality Education: UNC System Proposes New Funding Strategy

At the UNC system Board of Governors meeting on January 18, a new funding model was proposed, with some adjustments and feedback discussed at a follow-up meeting on February 23. Since the current funding model is outdated in many ways, a new system has been presented with the hope of encouraging educational quality rather than … Continue reading “Incentivizing Quality Education: UNC System Proposes New Funding Strategy”


No, the NC Legislature Hasn’t “Harmed” Public Universities

On February 6, the Raleigh News & Observer asked whether the North Carolina legislature has “done enough to actually damage the University of North Carolina System’s traditionally stellar quality during a decade of Republican control?” In a series of articles, it laid out its case that the answer is yes. But the evidence presented, especially … Continue reading “No, the NC Legislature Hasn’t “Harmed” Public Universities”


The Edifice Complex Has Come for Esports

Collegiate esports—competitive video gaming—has grown dramatically in recent years. Small private colleges and large state universities alike have built programs to attract students, grow name recognition, and pull in sponsorships. However, the expensive esports arenas in which students compete, and the annual budget commitments that come with new programs, have only attracted sponsors in a … Continue reading “The Edifice Complex Has Come for Esports”


Security Concerns with China Limiting Student Learning

The college campus has become a battleground between the United States and China. Donations, research funding, and international students give colleges a much-needed financial and enrollment boost, but the connection to the Chinese government can also threaten academic freedom and, on some occasions, national security. Fundamentally, universities exist to serve students and the public interest, … Continue reading “Security Concerns with China Limiting Student Learning”


Did You Know? Not All UNC Students Get the Same Funding

The University of North Carolina system includes 16 universities, from large campuses with high research activity to small liberal arts institutions. They differ in many ways, from location to student body to the classes they offer. They also differ in state funding—from $7,760 per student at Appalachian State University to $31,969 per student at the … Continue reading “Did You Know? Not All UNC Students Get the Same Funding”


How the North Carolina Legislature Can Improve Higher Education in 2018

Legislators returned to Raleigh last week for the beginning of a special session. Education was at the top of the agenda, with the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee meeting Tuesday to discuss various changes to North Carolina’s K-12 programs. That’s as it should be. Here in North Carolina, education makes up roughly 40 percent of … Continue reading “How the North Carolina Legislature Can Improve Higher Education in 2018”



Learn the ins & outs of pursuing “culturally correct” funding

A rising senior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, recently won a scholarship worth up to $20,000 to study Tajik and Russian languages in the Asian nation of Tajikistan. Since that scholarship obliges him to work in national security upon graduation, UNC-CH’s Prof. Charles Kurzman is worried about what kind of “dirty deeds” he might be up to.


Widespread Opposition to Broad’s Plan, Little Talk of Spending Priorities

UNC President Molly Broad’s latest proposal to win money for the University of North Carolina garnered opposition from some unlikely opponents last week, with those generally supportive of Broad’s quests offering perhaps the harshest criticism. Even strong opponents, however, remain stalwart in their demands that the legislature provide more money for N.C. universities.


High Salary Increases Lead To Other Problems at Community Colleges

Even as many North Carolina colleges and universities are asking for more money to raise faculty salaries, several community colleges say they need less money for faculty pay, but more money for other “needs.”