Letter to the Editor: Syllabi should be easier to obtain

To the editor: Peter Knupfer makes some valid points in his July 13 letter to the editor, “Syllabi Aren’t Secrets,” but I disagree that syllabi “are as public as can be.” I would like to examine all the syllabi of a particular highly influential academic department at a distant university. My formal requests have been … Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: Syllabi should be easier to obtain”


Letter to the Editor: Syllabi aren’t secrets

To the editor: Jenna Robinson’s concerns about syllabi are overwrought and misdirected.  No syllabus is ever a “secret.”  Syllabi are distributed to the students who enroll in the class, not locked in a vault somewhere; nowadays this almost universally is done electronically, so once it’s out of the stable, it’s as “public” as it could … Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: Syllabi aren’t secrets”


What Are Students Learning? Make Syllabi Public

Online education, especially as it has been implemented in the past year, isn’t for everyone. But it has had one unexpected benefit: transparency. Across the country, parents have had a chance to see for themselves what their children are learning. At the K-12 level, it’s been eye-opening. But college students need less supervision. So, even … Continue reading “What Are Students Learning? Make Syllabi Public”


What’s in a Syllabus? The Keys to Undoing Academic Freedom, If We’re Not Careful  

The syllabus is such a basic document that most of us tend not to think much about what goes into making one. What are its necessary ingredients? A listing of the required study and reading materials, obviously. Dates of important milestones, like term papers and exams, as well. Lecture schedules, weekly assignments, and a rubric … Continue reading “What’s in a Syllabus? The Keys to Undoing Academic Freedom, If We’re Not Careful  “