For Intercollegiate Sports, When is Enough Enough? 

Intercollegiate sports, particularly football and basketball, have ever so slowly, over the years, inserted themselves insidiously into the fabric of most universities with the support of alumni, the business community, and their college presidents. When will college presidents, university boards of visitors, students, parents, and alumni realize intercollegiate sports are detracting from universities’ educational missions … Continue reading “For Intercollegiate Sports, When is Enough Enough? “


The Sea Changes at the NCAA

Fifty years ago, I entered the University of Tennessee-Knoxville as a freshman scholarship runner on its high-profile track team. The NCAA held athletes to a strict amateur code in which compensation to athletes was limited to in-kind payments of room, board, books, and fees. The term “illegally paying players” meant sneaking in extra amenities including … Continue reading “The Sea Changes at the NCAA”


The Edifice Complex Has Come for Esports

Collegiate esports—competitive video gaming—has grown dramatically in recent years. Small private colleges and large state universities alike have built programs to attract students, grow name recognition, and pull in sponsorships. However, the expensive esports arenas in which students compete, and the annual budget commitments that come with new programs, have only attracted sponsors in a … Continue reading “The Edifice Complex Has Come for Esports”


Athletics Reform Is Possible Without the NCAA

In the past two decades, North Carolina higher education leaders have tried to address problems related to college athletics. But whether they’ve focused on the increasing pressure to admit academically ill-prepared student-athletes, or student-athletes spending more time on the practice field than in the classroom, to name just two examples, serious reform efforts have been met … Continue reading “Athletics Reform Is Possible Without the NCAA”


Enriching the NCAA Through State Law

Last month, former NC State football player Eric Leak made headlines for giving an unnamed UNC athlete “improper benefits,” in violation of the North Carolina Uniform Athlete Agents Act (UAAA). An article in the Raleigh News & Observer explained that Leak was also accused of defrauding former clients and possibly the Medicaid system. Both are … Continue reading “Enriching the NCAA Through State Law”