Critical Social Justice in the UNC System

From the executive summary of Critical Social Justice in the UNC System: Critical Social Justice (CSJ) poses a threat to higher education and to the American way of life. This school of thought goes by many names, including Critical Race Theory, Critical Theory, Multiculturalism, and Identity Politics. All these ideologies divide the world into aggrieved … Continue reading “Critical Social Justice in the UNC System”


Did You Know? NC Voters Reject Discrimination and Special Preferences

Discrimination is unpopular with voters. That’s good news. Last month, the John Locke Foundation released new polling data revealing that North Carolina voters would support an amendment to ban discrimination or special treatment in public education, hiring, and contracting. Nearly 70 percent of likely North Carolina voters said they would support an amendment “to prohibit … Continue reading “Did You Know? NC Voters Reject Discrimination and Special Preferences”


Dubious Expediencies: How Short-term Thinking on Race Has Caused Long-term Problems in Higher Education

The Martin Center will hold its annual policy banquet on Friday, October 29th—this year featuring Professor Gail Heriot—to discuss the “dubious expediency” of racial preferences. Tickets are available now!          The event is based on ideas discussed in a book of the same name. You may find A Dubious Expediency: How Racial Preferences Damage … Continue reading “Dubious Expediencies: How Short-term Thinking on Race Has Caused Long-term Problems in Higher Education”


Did You Know? The Negative Effects of Racial Preferences on Minority Students

Racial preferences in university admissions aim to increase the representation of minorities in higher education. Some, however, have objected to these policies and argue students should be admitted based on academic merit, not based on race. And evidence suggests that race-based admissions policies negatively affect minority students. In a 2013 article entitled “The Sad Irony … Continue reading “Did You Know? The Negative Effects of Racial Preferences on Minority Students”


A Broad and Devastating Offensive Against Racial Preferences

Last year, advocates of racial preferences in California, where they’d been banned  since 1996, attempted to change the law so that state colleges and universities could again give admission advantages to certain groups. Despite outspending opponents by about 15-1 and with backing from big business, labor, and other organizations, the effort at repealing racial neutrality … Continue reading “A Broad and Devastating Offensive Against Racial Preferences”


Blueprints for Reform

The university system in the United States has accomplished a great deal of good, but it has strayed from its chief goals of scholarly inquiry and responsible teaching, especially in the past 20 years. All too often, universities allow teaching to become shallow and trendy, failing to challenge students intellectually and disparaging traditional principles of … Continue reading “Blueprints for Reform”


Advancing the Radical Agenda at UNC-Chapel Hill with Sneaky Language

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of articles. Part I can be found here. The phrase “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion” is a loaded one; it does not signify noncontroversial principles, as might be assumed, but instead describes a radical political agenda. Throughout academia, programs and standards based on DEI are proliferating at a … Continue reading “Advancing the Radical Agenda at UNC-Chapel Hill with Sneaky Language”


The Harvard Professor Who Bemoans Higher Education

Most college professors applaud what American higher education does and want to see it expand to include even more students. One dissenter of note, however, is Harvard philosophy professor Michael Sandel. In his latest book, The Tyranny of Merit, he argues that higher education has become a big part of the problem he sees with … Continue reading “The Harvard Professor Who Bemoans Higher Education”


Leaving the Blight of Higher Education: Part II–Farewell, Faculty

Editor’s note: This is the second of a two-part essay; part I can be read here. The previous essay dealt with the moral decline of the student body in higher education—one of the motives behind my recent retirement after three decades of teaching college English. When I began teaching, most of the English faculty members, … Continue reading “Leaving the Blight of Higher Education: Part II–Farewell, Faculty”


Reforming Higher Ed in 2021

The year 2020 brought changes that colleges would have never made by choice. Enrollment declines, remote classes, and dramatic employee cuts (for faculty and some staff alike) were unthinkable a year ago. But, for the sake of the future, more work remains. Below are some priorities the Martin Center staff would like to see catch … Continue reading “Reforming Higher Ed in 2021”