Closing the Gap at North Carolina’s Historically Black Universities

Earlier this month, the Triangle Business Journal revealed that graduates from North Carolina’s Historically Black College and Universities (HBCUs) are lagging their peers in terms of median salary after graduation. As the state bolsters its efforts to attract more students to its public HBCUs, it’s especially important to discover the cause of such disparities and … Continue reading “Closing the Gap at North Carolina’s Historically Black Universities”


Everyone’s Offended: Campus Intolerance Can Come from Liberals and Conservatives

From Evergreen State College in Washington to Yale University in Connecticut, campaigns to punish or fire professors accused of thinking or saying things outside the bounds of political correctness seem to crop up with disturbing regularity. Often, we’ve seen these attacks coming from students, faculty, and administrators on the Left. Sometimes, however, conservatives have similar … Continue reading “Everyone’s Offended: Campus Intolerance Can Come from Liberals and Conservatives”


Due Process: Restoring a Fundamental Right on Campus

Four years ago, brothers at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity at UNC Wilmington (UNCW) brought campus due process—or lack thereof—into the sunlight. The young men had been accused of hazing and underage drinking. Although the students were eventually cleared of any wrongdoing, they endured an unfair and onerous investigation and adjudication process to prove their … Continue reading “Due Process: Restoring a Fundamental Right on Campus”


How to Make University Foundations More Transparent

University foundations are at the forefront of schools’ fundraising, event planning, and publicity efforts. But the details of how these foundations operate—such as where they get their money and what it pays for—often are hidden from public view. Many foundations are allowed to take advantage of their private non-profit status despite being considerably entangled with … Continue reading “How to Make University Foundations More Transparent”


Should Universities Be Outsourcing Their Chancellor Searches?

Among the duties of a university’s board of trustees, there is perhaps no bigger responsibility than helping to select the leader of the campus—the chancellor/president. Such an important responsibility requires diligence and a deep understanding of the needs and culture of the university. Many boards, however, have become increasingly reliant on private search firms to … Continue reading “Should Universities Be Outsourcing Their Chancellor Searches?”


Automatic Pay Raises for Teachers Create Perverse Incentives in Graduate Education

In 2013, North Carolina stopped giving automatic pay raises to public school teachers who earn master’s degrees. In the legislature, the debate focused on teachers and whether graduate degrees make them better at their jobs. There is little reason to believe so, as this and other studies show. Overlooked in this discussion is the predatory … Continue reading “Automatic Pay Raises for Teachers Create Perverse Incentives in Graduate Education”


NC’s Latest Higher Ed Budget: More Spending, Less Saving

The North Carolina General Assembly’s recently released budget for 2016-17 increases University of North Carolina System appropriations by $168 million, $31 million of which will be dedicated to fund projected enrollment increases. At many of the system’s 16 universities, however, increased funding for such a purpose is unnecessary. Furthermore, the new state higher education budget, … Continue reading “NC’s Latest Higher Ed Budget: More Spending, Less Saving”


Will New Transparency Measures Help North Carolina Students?

Whether or not you agree that a college degree is primarily worth its increase in potential earning power, students overwhelmingly rate the economic benefits of a degree as the top reason to go to college. And since students are faced with record rates of loan debt, delinquency, and default, it is especially important to ensure … Continue reading “Will New Transparency Measures Help North Carolina Students?”


College Dropouts Cost North Carolina Taxpayers $446M Per Year

Students who leave college with no degree but an accumulation of debt face obvious hardship, but what about taxpayer money wasted on students with no degrees? The results for North Carolina are staggering. Of the 155,982 students who enrolled in one of its 16 public universities last year, 52,184 will not graduate. To Dr. Harry … Continue reading “College Dropouts Cost North Carolina Taxpayers $446M Per Year”