‘If You Were Governor, What Would You Do?’

“The pathway to success is to keep the doors of our colleges and universities open to all, and to open them even wider,” North Carolina Governor Jim Hunt said in a recent editorial to The Chronicle of Higher Education, a national magazine that examines news and issues concerning colleges and universities nationwide. Hunt’s editorial appeared in the “Opinion & Arts” section of the July 16, 1999 edition of The Chronicle.


UNC-Chapel Hill one of highest-paying public universities, study finds

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill pays professors the fifth-highest average salary among public universities of its kind, a study by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy has found. The other Research I institution in North Carolina, North Carolina State University, also pays its professors well comparatively, with an average salary greater than the nationwide average for public Research I institutions. The study examined 56 Research I institutions’ salaries adjusted for the cost of living at each institution’s location.


Bonds: The Answer to UNC Construction Costs?

Bonds may not be the best answer to UNC’s rising construction cost, according to a recent analysis by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy. The report comes in the wake of a proposal by the UNC Board of Governors to meet the university’s construction needs by allowing the UNC-system to sell “special obligation” bonds and the state to issue “limited obligation” bonds. The proposal is scheduled to reach the General Assembly within weeks.



Duke University’s Slow Response to Death Threats Raises Questions

A barrage of hate mail, physical confrontations and death threats at Duke University has prompted suprisingly little reaction from a school that prides itself on tolerence and diversity. The trouble began when two freshmen, Berin Szoka and Jay Strader, submitted a series of op-editorials to The Chronicle, Duke’s student newspaper, protesting the creation of a Hindi major at Duke.




Supreme Court case has implications for N.C. universities

A case before the Supreme Court could change the way public universities in North Carolina and across the nation allocate student-activities fees. The Justices agreed to hear a suit five law students at the University of Wisconsin brought against their school over how the university allocated a portion of the mandatory activity fees it collects. Across the country, there has been several similar cases recently concerning potential First-Amendment violations by universities in their collection and expenditure of mandatory fees.