Student Congress Backs Universal Health Care

The Student Congress of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill recently expressed its support of legislative efforts to provide universal health care in North Carolina.


NEA Gives Thumbs Up to Distance Education

The National Education Association (NEA) this week released a study showing positive support among NEA-member faculty for distance education. The study polled more than 400 plus instructors who had taught distance-learning courses and 130 who had not in an effort to assess distance learning’s strengths and weaknesses. Currently, one in 10 higher-education NEA members teaches a distance-learning course.


UNC-TV Needs $65 Million

On Wednesday, less than ten hours before UNC-TV aired a documentary showcasing UNC’s facilities needs, UNC-TV director and general manager Tom Howe told the Joint Select Committee on Higher Education Facilities Needs that UNC-TV needs $65 million in state money to meet a federal mandate.


Charter Colleges Offer Benefits, Professors Contend

Converting traditional public colleges and universities to charter schools could pay off financially and spark innovation, according to a recent paper by the Boston-based Pioneer Institute.


States use online learning to save space, cut spending

What has been called a “crisis” by some higher education leaders in North Carolina is being viewed as an opportunity to cut state spending and improve services in Washington State.


UNC, Public College Students Post High Family Income

On average, students at the “flagship” universities of state college systems have a higher family income than their counterparts at private colleges and universities, according to a recent Washington Post report. The University of North Carolina is no exception.

A growing percentage of students are opting out of graduate school in order to stake their claim on the booming Internet business, according to a recent New York Times report.


The University of Virginia Reevaluates Its Use of Race in Admissions

The University of Virginia Board of Visitors recently adopted unanimously a resolution supporting the changes in the university admissions policy by President John T. Casteen III. Casteen this month acknowledged that in June he had ended the university’s use of a scoring system in admissions that awarded extra points to black applicants.


Victory at Wisconsin

The Faculty Senate of the University of Wisconsin at Madison voted Monday to narrow an 18-year old speech code that permits the punishment of professors for remarks that students find offensive. The new code, which was approved by a vote of 71 to 62, says that “all expressions germane to the instructional setting — including but not limited to information, the presentation or advocacy of ideas, assignment of course materials, and teaching techniques — is protected from disciplinary action.”

AND

Students in some N.C. State University courses are doing their homework and even taking quizzes on the World-Wide Web, thanks to a program designed primarily by N.C. State professors. The program, WebAssign, is used in physics, math, computer-science and statistics courses at N.C. State, provides instant feedback to students as they submit their homework and quiz answers online.


Sign of the Times, UNC-CH more Y2K ready than most

The University of Massachusetts at Amherst announced Feb. 18 that it would shift away from using race preferences in its admissions policies. The university will instead consider socioeconomic status and extracurricular activities when deciding whether to admit students and award financial aid.

AND

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is at a comparably high level of preparedness for the computer glitch known as the “Year 2000” (Y2K) problem, the campus’s University Gazette is reporting.