Of Title IX and 30 years of bureaucratic miasma

Just from reading the preamble to Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, one would not suspect it was the preamble to 30 years’ of controversy, fights over interpretation, compliance tests, and the noxious slew of bureaucratic miasma that followed: “No person in the U.S. shall, on the basis of sex be excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving federal aid.”


Today’s students get to dictate what constitutes a general education

Universities ostensibly provide students with rigorous training to prepare them for their chosen field. There’s more to it than that, however, because if it were only that, the students could skip the addlepated rigmarole that has become an accepted part of what’s blithely called “the college experience” (which amounts to hazing or coddling, depending upon one’s fealty to the campus’s hair-trigger socialist bent) and go directly to a private provider of vocational training.


Sign a form, get college credit

Shortly after winning the glorified popularity contest to be next year’s student body president at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jen Daum announced her plans to develop a course to teach students how to lobby the legislature. As reported by The Daily Tar Heel March 8, “Daum said students’ lack of knowledge about lobbying is a major reason why the university’s governing bodies have not been receptive to students’ concern in matters like the recent tuition proposals.”



N.C. State supports civil discourse, embattled professor

Administrators and professors at North Carolina State University have come to the support of embattled Prof. Philip Muñoz. Muñoz’s Political Science 205 class on Law and Justice was the site of an alleged racial attack Feb. 19, when a white female student, angered by the heated comments made about America and its treatment of blacks by a black student, Najja Baptist, told Baptist “go back to Africa.”


Sept. 11 figures in campus discussions on health, discrimination, and racism

The terrorist attacks on the United States and the subsequent U.S. war on terrorism were the subjects of a recent teach-in at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and were also referenced by North Carolina State University students during two recent campus events focusing on an entirely different subject, the racial climate.


Racial hypersensitivity poisons the campus climate

N.C. State has gone to great lengths to gauge its “racial climate.” But how worthwhile is this activity, really? A voluntary demonstration ostensibly designed to list incidents of racial injustices at N.C. State produced only four, all of which were really examples of racial hypersensitivity, only two of which related to N.C. State, and one of which was from two decades prior.




Survey finds one-sided political affiliation among UNC-Chapel Hill faculty

A survey of faculty members in nine departments at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found that over four-fifths are registered Democrats. The results of the survey, conducted by the conservative student magazine Carolina Review for its March issue, called into question UNC-CH’s devotion to diversity.